• 31st Annual Northwest Conference on Behavioral Health & Addictive Disorders

    May 30 - June 1, 2018
    Seattle, Washington

    This conference has ended, please see our Distance Learning options for recorded sessions from this conference.

    Contributing Sponsors

    • Treatment Center Full Banner

      Treatment Management

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      The Meadows

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      Newport Academy

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    Participating Sponsors

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    Exhibitors

    • american behavioral health
    • Smokey POint
    • Recovery Ways
    • Treatment Placement Specialist
    • Somatic Exp
    • ur1
    • Montevista Hospital
    • Provo
    • Schick
    • northpoint
    • Thira
    • ADAI
    • Acadia
    • Menninger
    • refuge
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    • Northbound New Logo
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    • Free By the Sea NEW
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     5:30–7:30pm 

    Early Conference Registration at Hyatt Regency Bellevue

    7:45 am               Registration Continued
    8:00–8:50 am    Continental Breakfast
    8:50 am              Opening and Welcome
                                       Dan Barmettler
                                       US Journal Training, Inc.


    9:00–10:30 am    Overcoming Self-Doubt and Shame: The Mindfulness Cure for the Narcissism Epidemic
    Ronald D. Siegel, PsyD

    Assistant Professor of Psychology, part time, Harvard Medical School; serves on the Board of Directors and faculty, Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy; is author of The Mindfulness Solution: Everyday Practices for Everyday Problems, coauthor of Back Sense: A Revolutionary Approach to Halting the Cycle of Chronic Back Pain and Sitting Together: Essential Skills for Mindfulness-Based Psychotherapy; and coeditor of Mindfulness and Psychotherapy, 2nd Edition.

    What if our therapeutic goals of improving self-esteem, developing a stable and coherent sense of self, and expressing our authentic feelings all turn out to be misguided? What if they inadvertently feed the cultural enthusiasm for celebrity and success that makes so many of us miserable? This presentation will examine how mindfulness practices can be harnessed in psychotherapy to reexamine our conventional sense of self, leading both us and our clients toward greater well-being, wisdom, and compassion.

    10:30–11:00 am        Refreshment Breaks
        AM & PM Breaks will be held each day in Exhibit Area


    11:00–12:30 pm    Shame and Dignity
    Peter A. Levine, PhD

    Developer of Somatic Experiencing® a naturalistic and neurobiological, approach to healing trauma which he has developed during the past 45 years. This work has been taught to 30,000 therapists in 43 countries. Dr. Levine has received the Lifetime Achievement award from the US Association for Body-Oriented Psychotherapy, and an honorary award as the Reiss-Davis Chair in Los Angeles for his lifetime contribution to infant and child psychiatry. In addition, he has recently also received the lifetime achievement (from the Association for Training on Trauma and Attachment in Children) for “his lifelong commitment to healing children through research, education, and outreach.”  Dr. Levine has doctorates, both in Biological and Medical Physics (Biophysics) from UC Berkeley and a doctorate in Psychology from International University. Dr. Levine is currently a Senior Fellow and consultant at The Meadows Addiction and Trauma Treatment Center in Wickenburg, Arizona. He is the author of several best-selling books on trauma, including Waking the Tiger, Healing Trauma (published in 28 languages), In an Unspoken Voice, How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness, as well as Trauma and Memory: Brain and Body in a Search for the Living Past.

    Shame is one of the most corrosive and immobilizing emotions. It underlies many issues of addiction and so-called impulse control, certain anxiety states, and other “behavioral” problems. Shame is like a cancer, a tumor that grows from the injury of trauma and the wound of betrayal. This interpersonal trauma becomes deeply lodged in the body-mind, and then “metastasizes,” infecting all aspects of a person’s life. They include a loss of connection with our authentic, spontaneous Self, as well as with our basic sense of “rightness” and belonging in the world. In therapy, it can be difficult to work with shame, as bringing it up often results in more shame and reactive avoidance maneuvers. In addition, when clients begin to access shame, their therapists (because of similar unresolved issues) may subtly deflect or inhibit this exploration.  This is likely to result in an intensification of the impulse to hide and deny.  However, when we understand the neurobiological, developmental, and evolutionary underpinnings of shame and trauma, we can better help our clients (as well as ourselves) move out of shame and restore a core sense of dignity, goodness and self-compassion.

    2:00–3:30 pm    CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

    Adolescent Addiction, Cannabis Dependence, and  Prescription Drug Abuse
    David Smith, MD, DFASAM, FAACT

    Recognized as a national leader in the pharmacology and treatment of addictive disease, Dr. Smith is Founder of Haight-Ashbury Free Clinics in San Francisco, and Past President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. He is currently Chair of Addiction Medicine for Muir Wood Adolescent & Family Services in Petaluma, CA and Consulting Physician for North Bay Recovery Center and Avery Lane for Women. A Distinguished Fellow of ASAM (DFASAM) and has recently been named a Fellow of the International Society of Addiction Medicine (FISAM).

    Chanda Rankin, PhD, CADC II
    Chief Clinical Officer for Muir Wood Adolescent and Family Services. A licensed Clinical Psychologist and Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor, Dr. Rankin has worked with a variety of clinical populations suffering from addiction, mental illness and co-occurring disorders across adolescent, adult, and family settings. In private practice, her specialties included individual psychotherapy, treating complex co-occurring disorders, psychological testing, and psycho-education for family members and significant others. Prior to joining Muir Wood, Dr. Rankin’s prior positions included Clinical Supervisor for Visions Adolescent Treatment Center, Program Director for PCH Treatment Center, Director of the MusiCares Foundation, and Primary Therapist for Promises Treatment Programs in Los Angeles, CA and Alta Mira in Sausalito, CA. She is also the Co-Founder and former Board Member for the Women’s Association of Addiction Treatment (WAAT).

    As the opioid epidemic and cannabis abuse and dependence worsens across the United States, healthcare professionals are looking for new strategies to prevent and respond to the rising challenges. This session will provide attendees with a history of this epidemic, current trends in treatment, the rise of legalization and the commercialization of cannabis and its’ effect on teens, and prevention, treatment and response priorities. Presenter David Smith, MD, FASAM, past President of ASAM, will focus on trends and treatment while co-facilitator, Chanda Rankin will be discussing the challenges we face clinically when treating kids and families when it comes to cannabis

    Mindfulness for Anxiety and Depression
    Ronald D. Siegel, PsyD

    Mindfulness is being touted lately as the cure of everything that ails us as human beings. How can a simple set of practices possibly help with so many psychological disorders? This presentation will examine the common factors in psychological difficulties, and explore how mindfulness practices can help us with two of the most common: anxiety and depression.

    Shame and Dignity—A Practical Implementation
    Peter A. Levine, PhD

    Extending upon his keynote presentation, Shame and Dignity, Dr. Levine will invite one or two volunteers from the audience to participate in a client/therapist demonstration with him regarding issues around shame. In this breakout session, you will learn how to detect the posture of shame, differentiate between agitated shame and collapsed shame, and explore how to work with each. You will observe how Dr. Levine helps a client to develop awareness of their shame posture, by using body-oriented tools and exercises. This helps the client to interrupt their shame postures, guiding them out of the physical sense of shame, back to a sense of pride, dignity, and self-compassion. From these empowered psychophysiological states, the client is provided the space to reflect and tease apart the traumatic sensations, images, beliefs and emotions associated with shame, and individuate between healthy and unhealthy shame, and re-establish healthy boundaries.

    Interoceptive Awareness Training Improves Health Outcomes and  Emotion Regulation Among Women in Substance Use Disorder Treatment  
    Cynthia Price, PhD, MA, LMT

    She is a Research Assoc. Professor at the University of Washington School of Nursing.  With a PhD in Nursing Science, her clinical background and expertise is in mind-body therapies and in working with people who are disconnected from their bodies due to stress, trauma, or emotional and physical pain. Dr. Price is an NIH-funded researcher, and on the Advisory Council of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health at NIH. Her research is focused on the study of body awareness for health and healing, with a particular focus on women in recovery from chemical dependency and/or interpersonal trauma.

    Interoception, awareness of sensory cues from the body, is critical for regulation and behavioral change. Imaging studies show introceptive dysfunction among those with substance use disorder (SUD). The results of a NIDA-funded study to examine the effects of interoceptive training will be presented. Interceptive training was delivered through an 8 week intervention called Mindful Awareness in Body-oriented Therapy (MABT). Implemented in community clinics, 217 women in IOP were randomly assigned to one of three study conditions: treatment as usual (TAU), TAU + MABT, or TAU + Women’s Health Education (active control condition).  The immediate pre-post findings show significant improvements in depression, emotion regulation, and craving for MABT vs. other study groups. The results indicate that interoceptive awareness training improves health outcomes, and support neurocognitive models that link interoception to emotion regulation in SUD treatment and recovery.

    4:00–5:30 pm    CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

    Mindfulness and Intimacy: For Partners, Parents, and Therapists
    Ronald D. Siegel, PsyD

    We know that mindfulness practice can help us get along with ourselves better, but with other people? This workshop will explore how mindfulness meditation can help our clients and us develop the affect tolerance and capacity to be with and understand others that are critical for successful intimate relationships. You’ll leave this workshop knowing how to use mindfulness to react less personally to the inevitable ups and downs of interpersonal life, and how interpersonal mindfulness techniques can enhance therapeutic, romantic, and parent-child interactions.

    Breaking the Cycle of Addiction: Healing Trauma  with Substance Abuse Clients
    Barbara Nosal, PhD, LMFT, LADC

    Barbara Nosal has worked in the mental health and addiction treatment field with adolescents and their    families for over 20 years. She has held managerial and clinical positions in a variety of treatment settings, including a private practice in Newport Beach. She holds a doctorate in Transpersonal Psychology and dual master’s degrees in human services and counseling psychology, is a licensed Marriage Family Therapist and a licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor. Dr. Nosal is the founding Clinical Director, and currently Chief Clinical Officer of Newport Academy, where she oversees the treatment of adolescents, ages 12-20, and their families in residential and outpatient programs.
    Unresolved traumas from the past reinforce the cycle of addiction in the present. Exploring past traumas, through the lens of family systems and attachment theories, provides the context for life-long relational and emotional patterns that drive behavior. The different types of trauma, effects and treatment modalities are introduced in an integrative treatment approach for substance abusers.  Blending stabilization and symptom management with restructuring disempowering core beliefs and healing trauma in the present creates a sense of freedom from the cycle of addiction.  

    Experiential Workshop: An Introduction to Interoceptive  Awareness Skills for Clinical Care
    Cynthia Price, PhD, MA, LMT

    Interoceptive Awareness involves the ability to access and bring attention to (i.e. observe, experience, appraise) inner bodily sensations. The purpose of this workshop is to learn strategies to facilitate interoceptive awareness in substance use disorder treatment. Increasing the capacity for interoceptive awareness in clients can facilitate increased self-awareness and attendance to bodily cues to better engage in self-care for physical and emotional well-being. An interactive workshop, the majority of the time will be spent practicing and exploring various ways to access assess inner body awareness. We will also discuss the application of these techniques in treatment.

    EMDR Therapy and Mindfulness: Redefining the Paradigm  for Trauma-Focused Care
    Stephen Dansiger, PsyD, MFT

    A rocker who got sober in the late 80’s and then became a sought after clinician, writer and meditation teacher. Became a master EMDR therapist and provider of EMDR Basic Training and Advanced Topics Courses with the Institute for Creative Mindfulness.  At Refuge Recovery center he has developed and instituted a design for addictions agency treatment using Buddhist Mindfulness and EMDR Therapy. He has been practicing Buddhist mindfulness for almost 30 years (including a one year residency at a Zen monastery), and teaches dharma classes regularly at Against the Stream Buddhist Meditation Society and other centers nationally and internationally. Author of Clinical Dharma: A Path for Healers and Helpers and avidly blogs and podcasts on topics related to mental health, recovery, and mindfulness. Co-author of EMDR Therapy and Mindfulness for Trauma-Focused Care.

    This presentation combines the wisdom of Buddha, Pierre Janet, modern mindfulness teachers and Dr. Francine Shapiro, providing a new way of envisioning trauma-focused care. We will focus most directly on the infusion of Mindfulness practices into EMDR therapy in all 8 phases of the standard protocol, as described in the book EMDR Therapy and Mindfulness for Trauma Focused Care by Dr. Dansiger and Jamie Marich. It is appropriate and of interest both for EMDR trained and non-EMDR trained therapists.
     
    7:00–8:30 pm     Evening Session (Optional)
    Clinical Practices for Loss: A Griever’s Capacity to Cope
    Michael Kahn, LPC, JD

    The death of friends and family is a sad and inevitable part of life. No matter the circumstances, the loss is often highly impactful on many levels. We will discuss the impact of loss, focusing much of our time on two areas of research, resilience and posttraumatic growth. In addition to this research, we will learn from another source, Abraham Lincoln. He persevered through many personal and professional losses so his experience can be instructive.

    9:00–10:00 am    The Neuroscience and Practice of Compassion

    This talk is sponsored by Newport Academy
    Joan Borysenko, PhD

    This distinguished pioneer in integrative medicine is a world-renowned expert in the mind-body connection. Her work has been foundational in an international health-care revolution that recognizes the role of  meaning, and the spiritual dimensions of life, as an integral part of health and healing. Harvard Medical School trained cancer cell biologist, a licensed psychologist, and bestselling author of 15 books including New York Times bestselling Minding the Body, Mending the Mind, It’s Not the End of the World: Developing Resilience in Times of Change, and The Plant Plus Diet Solution: Personalized Nutrition for Life.     

    Compassion is the awareness of suffering of others, and the desire to alleviate it.  Compassion activates the reward circuits of the brain, inhibits the stress response, and increases psychological and physical wellbeing. Research in interpersonal neurobiology describes how the mind is both embodied in the brain and nervous system, while also embedded in relationships. The quality of relationship affects the release of informational molecules by the brain and gut. These signaling molecules turn genes on and off and predispose to health or disease; anxiety, depression or equanimity. Loving relationship to self and others is the crucible from which health and healing emerge. Fortunately, compassion can be cultivated with simple mental tools derived from meditation practice, mindfulness, and positive psychology.

    10:30–11:30 am   MAT and the Opioid Crisis in America
    Andrea G. Barthwell, MD, DFASAM

    Chief Medical Officer for Treatment Management Company and the Founder and Director at Two Dreams Outer Banks, a comprehensive wellness center for the treatment of alcoholism and substance abuse disorders. She is also the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of the Washington, DC based global health care and policy consulting firm EMGlobal LLC. Dr. Barthwell served as Deputy Director for Demand Reduction at Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP, 2002-2004). She received her Doctor of Medicine from the University of Michigan. Following post graduate training she began her practice in the Chicago area. Dr. Barthwell served as Past President of The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM).

    The U.S. is in the middle of an opioid epidemic that leaves no community untouched and has driven even the most conservative of individuals to suggest extreme and radical responses just so individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) do not die.  The most important decision a clinician can make is to decide which of three (3) simple solutions can be applied at the assessment or discovery phase of initiation of treatment for each patient who presents for care whether in a law enforcement setting following an arrest, at a hospital emergency room following an overdose, or as a result of chronic opioid therapy in a patient with pain.  Unfortunately, there are solutions that are not immediately available to those who could benefit from them.  As this epidemic deepens, it is important for clinicians to examine their biases for and against Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) and how those biases may act to interfere with referral to and advocacy for the most appropriate treatment for some.  

    11:30–12:30 pm    The Best Kept Secret in Psychology:     Understanding Emotional Regression
    John Lee, MA

    Best-selling author of The Flying Boy: Healing the Wounded Man, has written 22 books, including the The Half-Lived Life. Growing Yourself Back Up: Understanding Emotional Regression and his latest book Breaking the Mother-Son Dynamic: Resetting the Patterns of a Man’s Life and Loves. Known for his innovative work in the fields of emotional intelligence, anger management and emotional regression, his contributions in the fields of recovery, relationships, men’s issues, spirituality, parenting and creativity have put him in the national spotlight for over 25 years. John served as a professor at the University of Texas and Alabama.

    Emotional regression is seldom identified, discussed and therefore undiagnosed as a major contributor in mental health and addiction issues. In this presentation by a leading authority on emotional regression participants will define regression, be introduced to the 5 red flags of regression, the five pre-conditions for regression and how to bring clients, parents and therapists out of regression. Lee has taught this material to men and women around the world and trained thousands of therapists, counselors and psychologists. Understanding and working with regression changes every relationship for the better. How? It reduces and even eliminates the energy-draining confrontations, conflicts, misunderstandings and miscommunications. You will learn skills to guide clients to feel more mature, competent, powerful and live more fully in the present moment.

    2:00–3:30 pm    CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

    Transference and Countertransference: Exploring the Role of  Consciousness in the Provider-Client Relationship
    Elisabeth R. Crim, PhD

    A licensed psychologist, certified Relax/Renew yoga trainer, and founder/director of Moonstone Center, a network of alternative therapies teaming together for whole person mental health treatment and professional development offered in the context of self-care. Dr. Crim also has Masters degrees in Theology; Psychology; and Counseling and has provided treatment for over 25 years, offering psychotherapy, consultation, and training from an Inter-Subjective Psychodynamic (Stolorow) & Holistic Mind-Body Spirit approach. She is currently active on professional boards in the role of CARE or SELF CARE Chair or Committee Member. Dr. Crim is founding editor of the monthly e-newsletter and video, The Healer’s Life!

    Regardless of theoretical orientation or treatment intervention, the ultimate good, safe treatment of a client requires the provider to have awareness of the underlying processes that are at play in the therapeutic relationship. Dr. Crim speaks to the powerful role of transference and countertransference, including somatic and spiritual transference, in the process of conscious, ethical, effective intervention. Transference will be explored as an unconscious organizing activity of the relational dynamics between provider and client, based in the Intersubjective Approach to Psychodyamic Psychotherapy (Stolorow) and holistic neurobiological mind-body-spirit approaches. Benefits of increased relational consciousness for both provider and client explored.

    Boundaries, Limits, Anger and Rage: Keys to  Reduce Conflicts, Confrontations and Addictions
    John Lee, MA

    We can help clients minimize their anger and rage by teaching them how they can establish healthy boundaries and set functional limits. This is accomplished by modeling. Before boundaries can reduce anger and rage and before a counselor or parent can model how to use these two major tools for managing emotions a few things must first be accomplished. They are: Boundaries must be defined, Different kinds of boundaries discussed, Boundary errors understood, Boundary violations explained, and Boundary impairment identified. Boundaries help us to know who we are and who we aren’t. They show me where I begin and end, where you begin and end, by establishing the appropriate psychological, emotional, and physical space between us. Limits is often confused with boundaries and not knowing our limits or the limits of others create massive amounts of confusion, uncertainty and anger and rage. This presentation will explore limits in a way many clinicians have not been introduced to.

    Enhancing Reflective Practice:  Issues in Ethical Decision—Making (Part 1)
    Michael Kahn, LPC, JD

    Presents training workshops on ethics, grief, implicit bias, wellness and other topics for mental health professionals and lawyers in the U.S. and abroad, including for the US military in Germany and Japan. He wrote the chapter “Saying Goodbye: Loss and Bereavement” in Cinemeducation, Volume 2: Using Film and Other Visual Media in Graduate and Medical Education. He is among the forefront in his field on the use of film in therapy and workshops. In his free time, Michael makes documentary films.

    Understanding culture and bias are critical to providing superior care. The various ethics codes are instructive. As examples, the APA code states that psychologists “ensure that their potential biases…do not lead to or condone unjust practices” and the ACA code requires that counselors “explore their own cultural identities and how these affect their values and beliefs about the counseling process.” In this workshop we will explore how the therapist’s cultural values and biases can affect interactions with their clients.  Of course, the goal of this workshop is not to eliminate biases, an impossible task, but to increase awareness of them so that they do not interfere with the client’s progress. We will also discuss bias reduction strategies.

    The Cutting Edge of Mind-Body Medicine:  From Immunology to Neuroscience
    Joan Borysenko, PhD

    The most important determinant of physical health is mental health. In this research-based practical presentation, participants will learn how adverse childhood experiences set the stage for chronic illness and substance abuse later in life through epigenetic changes, neurochemistry, immune function, and brain wiring. Dr. Borysenko will examine how evidence-based psychological interventions can rewire neuro-hormonal circuitry and help restore both physical and mental balance. Some of the interventions covered include the modification of explanatory style, stress hardiness and resilience training, narrative medicine, meditation and mindfulness techniques, imagery, cognitive approaches, and the all-important gut-brain connection. Since the quality of the provider-client relationship is key to healing, there will be an implicit focus on how to optimize the therapeutic bond.

    4:00–5:30 pm    CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

    Healing the Father-Son Wound: A Journey into Mature Masculinity
    John Lee, MA

    Where is the father? 50% percent of middle and low-income families in America are one-parent households. The father more often is the absent one emotionally, physically, financially and does not model (he didn’t have a model either) with regards to how to be a man. While mothers, aunts, grandparents do their best to bring the adolescent into adulthood they cannot, nor are they supposed to teach him how to feel his wounds, express his feelings, and heal those wounds that the father bequeaths to the son. Without healthy male role models and mentors a hole develops in the son, a wall is built around the son, anger and rage reside in the son, drugs and alcohol numbs that hole for a time. As the poet Rilke says, “the abused becomes the abuser.” And yet teachers, other adults and most of all women wonder why they are so angry and what to do about it. This presentation will go a long way in answering this question by one of the early pioneers in Men’s Work and Recovery.


    Compassion Fatigue & Vicarious Trauma:  The Role of Provider Mindfulness & Self Care
    Elisabeth R. Crim, PhD

    Empathy, transference, and countertransference, core processes providers engage routinely throughout a psychotherapy session or other direct service delivery, are highly integrated processes involving cognitive, somatic, and spiritual dynamics.  Repeated negative experiences with one client or over time with many clients are a natural hazard of helping professions. The latter can result in neurobiological imbalances, fatigue, mental or physical illness, and existential or spiritual difficulties for the individual providing treatment.  Vicarious or secondary trauma, compassion fatigue or burnout may develop. Developing a mindful self-care plan can mitigate or prevent the latter consequences for providers, and further safeguard safe treatment of clients.

    Opiates and Pain Management
    Andrea G. Barthwell, MD, DFASAM

    Patients who are prescribed opioids for pain management are exposed to medications that carry risk of dependence and these patients may become a part of those counted in the opioid epidemic.  In some of these patients, the risk is inherent to the prescription.  Opioids are just one part of the management of pain and do not work for all patients for whom they are prescribed and may create negative side effects for some, causing them to refuse to use them.  Other patients may have a history of a substance use disorder and fear re-activation of the disease if exposed.  Some patients who choose to use opioids find that chronic exposure to opioids leads to a vicious cycle of intensified pain, which requires more medication with fewer benefits.  But, all is not lost when opioids are not an option; many strategies can be applied to assist patients in the management of their pain.  

    Buddhist Psychology and Trauma-Focused Care
    Stephen Dansiger, PsyD, MFT

    2600 years ago the historical Buddha proposed and transmitted a complete psychology over his 45 years of teaching. The MET(T)A Protocol (Mindfulness and EMDR Treatment for Trauma and Adverse Life Events) is described, usable tools are taught and experienced, expanding in particular on the Buddhist concepts found in Dr. Dansiger’s new book (with Jamie Marich) EMDR Therapy and Mindfulness for Trauma Focused Care.

    Enhancing Reflective Practice: Issues in Ethical Decision-Making (Part 2)
    Michael Kahn, LPC, JD

    We make a multitude of choices and judgments every day and these decisions are often based on unconscious information. Problems can arise when our unconscious brains take short cuts that lead to biases and stereotypes. This is where our conscious reasoning can play a role, but often doesn’t because it is “lazy.”  With a nod toward behavioral ethics and moral psychology, in Part 2 we will explore some common unconscious biases and what we can do to avoid falling into their traps. Relatedly, we will discuss why we experience gaps between our actual behavior (“want” self) and our desired behavior (“should” self) and strategies to improve our ethical decision-making both in and out of the office.

    7:00-8:30 pm     Evening Session (Optional)
    Refuge Recovery: A Buddhist Path to Addiction Recovery
    Noah Levine, MA

    Noah Levine is the founder of Refuge Recovery, an addiction recovery program based on the teachings of the Buddha. Refuge Recovery has hundreds of peer-led meetings worldwide and a treatment center in Los Angeles. He is also the founder of the “Against The Stream Buddhist Meditation Society” with centers in Los Angeles and San Francisco and over 20 affiliated groups in North America and Europe. He teaches meditation groups, gives workshops and leads retreats internationally. Noah is the author of Dharma Punx, Against the Stream, Heart of the Revolution and Refuge Recovery.

    The Buddhist path to treating addiction is one of developing wisdom and compassion through meditation, renunciation and wise actions such as service, amends, forgiveness and generosity. Buddhism offers a non-theistic spiritual path. Refuge Recovery is a program that can be worked in conjunction with or as an alternative to twelve steps. When sincerely practiced, the program will ensure a full recovery from addiction and a lifelong sense of well-being and happiness.

    9:00-10:00 am    Resilience:The Neuroscience of Bouncing Back      from Disappointment, Difficulty, and Even Disaster
    Linda Graham, LMFT

    An experienced psychotherapist in the San Francisco Bay Area who integrates modern neuroscience, mindfulness practices and relational psychology in her nationwide trainings and workshops. She is the author of Bouncing Back: Rewiring Your Brain for Maximum Resilience and Well-Being and The Resilience Toolkit: Powerful Practices for Bouncing Back from Disappointment, Difficulty, and Even Disaster (forthcoming September 2018).

    Clinicians learn to create the conditions of emotional and relational resonance and safety necessary to prime the neuroplasticity of clients’ brains to fully rewire conditioned, dysfunctional patterns of coping, encode new more skillful behaviors of coping, and recover their resilience and well-being. Clinicians also learn evidenced-based tools to strengthen clients’ somatic, emotional, relational and reflective intelligences to fully develop clients’ innate response flexibility so that clients increasingly trust their own skills and competencies at coping with any level of disruption to their resilience.

    10:30–11:30 am    Having Hope as Our Job Gets Harder
    Pat Love, EdD

    Known for her warmth, humor, and practical, research based wisdom. Distinguished professor, licensed marriage and family therapist and long-standing clinical member and approved supervisor in American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy and served as President of the International Association for Marriage and Family Counseling. Pat has authored/co-authored six books including Never Be Lonely Again: The Way Out of Emptiness, Isolation and a Life Unfulfilled, and her most recent book You’re Tearing Us Apart: Several Ways to Wreck a Relationship and Strategies to Fix Them, and numerous professional articles.

    It’s difficult to ignore the many challenges of 21st Century living and those of us in the helping professions are on the front line of support. Changes in relationships, family structure, economic opportunities and time management have transformed the landscape of everyday living and thus require new ways of coping. Come explore clinical strategies, some of which are basic, but others mind-blowing.

    11:30–12:30 pm    Sex Addiction 101: Sex, Porn and Addiction in the Digital Age
    Robert Weiss, LCSW, CSAT-S

    A digital-age intimacy and relationships expert specializing in infidelity and addictions—most notably sex, porn, and love addiction. An internationally acknowledged clinician, he frequently serves as a subject expert on human sexuality for multiple media outlets including CNN, HLN, MSNBC, The Oprah Winfrey Network, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, and NPR, among others. He is the author of several highly regarded books, including Out of the Doghouse: A Step-by-Step Relationship-Saving Guide for Men Caught Cheating; Sex Addiction 101: A Basic Guide to Healing from Sex, Porn and Love Addiction; Sex Addiction 101: The Workbook; Closer Together, Further Apart: The Effect of Technology and the Internet on Parenting, Work and Relationships and Cruise Control: Understanding Sex Addiction in Gay Men. A skilled clinical educator, he routinely provides training to therapists, the US military, hospitals, and psychiatric centers in the US and abroad. Over the years, he has created and overseen more than a dozen high-end addiction and mental health treatment facilities. Currently, he is CEO of Seeking Integrity, LLC.

    In the real world, tens of thousands of men and women daily voluntarily choose to attend sex, porn and  relationship addiction 12 step programs and related therapies. Yet in the clinical world, the DSM 5 does not acknowledge the issue (Hypersexual Disorder), while many consider it a joke, a form of social control or simply “an excuse” for bad behavior. This talk is designed to offer realistic, useful insight into the problem of compulsive/addictive porn use, infidelities and other sexual acting out (on and offline). The talk will provide insight into the process addictions, their treatment and the empathic insight required to view this problem for what it is—the adult expression of early complex trauma and attachment loss.

    1:45–3:15 pm    CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

    How to Tailor Treatment Plans to Meet Individual Needs Within the  Context of an Ever-Changing Behavioral Health Care Landscape
    Stephen Odom, PhD, LMFT

    Distinguished healthcare and addiction treatment professional with over 25 years of expertise in the behavioral health field. He currently, serves as the CEO and Chief Clinical Officer of New Vista Behavioral Health, the parent company of Center for Professional Recovery, Avalon Malibu, Avalon Integrative and Simple Recovery. In his notable and lengthy career in behavioral health treatment, Stephen has proven to be an innovator in the industry. His vision, which is driven by the guiding principle that people suffering from psychiatric and addiction disorders can, and do get well, has become the cornerstone of New Vista Behavioral Health’s client care model. He is a licensed marriage and family therapist in the state of California and holds a Master’s in Clinical Psychology and a Doctorate with a focus in Healthcare Administration.

    Presentation will outline carefully crafted and effective treatment solutions to create healthy and productive recovery and success. Evidence-based methods of treating mental health, alcoholism and drug addiction—practicing a combination of the most current therapeutic interventions and proven modalities will be described.

    Narcissism, Attachment and Shame
    Lisa Erickson, MS, LMHC

    Has a full time psychotherapy practice in Seattle serving gifted adults, half of who struggle with addictions. Regionally, she offers continuing education programs on addiction, professional ethics, and narcissism. Nationally and internationally, Lisa presents and writes about working with the high IQ client. In previous incarnations, Lisa has been a program director, clinical director and adjunct professor in a graduate psychology program. Lisa likes thinking of ways to improve the work and healing environments for providers and clients. Her current clinical interests—aside from the clinical implications of intelligence—are multiculturalism and whiteness, ethical issues and evidence-based practices, and how to do ethics trainings that are not scary or anxiety-producing.  

    We will explore the relationship between shame, addiction, and narcissism, and why this is such a common triad in clinical work. We will quickly review the shame dynamic before moving on to clinical tips and suggestions. Participants will: Learn the importance of not confusing shame with guilt, and why “otherness” is an important element in shame. Understand the different types of narcissism and how they are understood within addiction theory. Learn clinical tips in working with the narcissistic /addicted client. Recognize signs of healthy development in healing from attachment wounds.

    A Model for Therapeutic Spirituality
    Pat Love, EdD

    How do you help clients (and ourselves) develop a guide for spirituality when it is the most intimate, private, and uniquely personal aspect of our lives? Do we dare address a theme that is sometimes aligned with religion and left to the guidance of clergy? This workshop offers a heuristic model for integrating therapy and spirituality that honors an individual’s personal preferences and beliefs.

    #metoo meet #imperfectmen: Women Are Speaking Out— Are Men Listening?
    Robert Weiss, LCSW, CSAT-S

    It is a magnificent thing to watch the rise of America’s 21st century women’s movement version 2.0. This, especially meaningful now, had you been around to see/observe or even learn about the women’s movement version 1.0 (1962-1982). Unsurprisingly, both now and in the 20th century, issues directly related to human sexuality and sexual interactions between the sexes were the spark that lit up such cultural revolutions in both eras, both of which eventually spread out to represent more general concerns of women’s equality issues. But what are men learning today. As so many women bravely speak out today about sexual violation and relationship abuse, today we pay the most attention to her, as we skewer and then eliminate the man who has been accused. But what about all the rest of the guys whose behavior has been less than stellar. Where is the room and the opportunity for all us #imperfectmen to talk about our confusion, our mistakes and our need to grow? Is the only response to a sexual accusation by a woman to ‘eliminate’ such men from view (by firing them for example)? This timely, highly topical talk will address the thinking behind men who push women into unwanted sexual acts (non-offending) and what it takes for such men to grow (emotionally and relationally).

    Resilience and Post-Traumatic Growth
    Linda Graham, LMFT

    People do learn and grow from meeting the challenges and adversities of the human condition when they have enough support, resources and skills to do so. Discoveries of neuroscientists, mental health counselors, and spiritual teachers in the emerging field of resilience and post-traumatic growth teach us how people can learn to cope with the trials and troubles, even tragedies, of their lives, and find a deeper sense of meaning, purpose, and fulfillment through their process of recovery. Clinicians will learn to apply practices of mindfulness, self-compassion and resonant relationships to five factors that predict genuine post-traumatic growth: acceptance of reality (and the consequences of what happened); resourcing with family, friends, and community; recognizing the positive in the midst of the difficult, writing the coherent narrative of the event within the larger life story, and appreciating the new life that emerges because of the difficulty, not just in spite of it.

    3:30–5:00 pm    CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

    Positive Communication: Inspiring Your Team (and Yourself)
    Wallace Wilkins, PhD

    Wallace Wilkins, PhD, serves as seminar facilitator, organizational consultant, psychologist and conflict mediator. His workshops help individuals and organizations create low conflict, low stress and high achievement. His Seattle-based psychotherapy practice focuses on chemical dependency, mood problems, and relationships.

    Polish your leadership skills to enhance your workplace relationships, your performance and your career success. In this program, you will learn how to convert negative criticism into constructive mentoring—even after setbacks. Practice an engaging, Yes-based communication strategy that will make people eager to hear your message.

    Brain Care as Self Care
    Linda Graham, LMFT

    Participants will learn practical tools to reduce stress, avoid compassion fatigue and burnout, and recover the deep satisfaction of clinical work: Doable micro-practices involving exercise, sleep, nutrition, learning, play and social interactions that foster brain health. Body-based tools of breath, touch, movement and visualization to restore the nervous system’s natural range of resilience. Practices to cultivate the positive emotions—gratitude, kindness, joy—that counter-balance the brain’s negativity bias and strengthen resources for resilient coping.

    OMG I’m Addicted to my Cellphone! And Other  Millennial Myths (vs reality)
    Robert Weiss, LCSW, CSAT-S

    What defines “technology addiction?” Should we be concerned about our kids, ourselves, our future? What about cell phone addiction? Some early (much touted) adolescent research says that our kids are more stressed and depressed by their deep daily dive into the Internet world, that we need to better protect them. How do we manage a problem that we don’t yet fully understand? And what about kids/teens and online porn? What’s a parent/teacher/clinician to do about that? This talk is designed to help participants weed out the myths vs realities of our current technology driven generation gap, focusing attendees on what we need and how we can go about learning it, in order to provide the most effective care to kids and families today.

    Loneliness: The Hidden Ingredient in Relationships,  Recovery and Real-life Contentment
    Pat Love, EdD

    Clients rarely come for help citing loneliness as the primary problem yet this issue may just be the true elephant in the living room. Presentation takes a comprehensive look at the underlying issues of loneliness; five different types of loneliness and practical strategies for recovery and life contentment.

    Participants will be able to:
    1. Identify treatment approaches and develop counseling skills for a range of issues in mental health, behavioral health, addictions and co-occurring disorders.
    2. Identify the neuropsychological and neurobiological underpinnings of addictive disorders, compulsive behaviors and other problematic behavior and the therapeutic implications of these findings.
    3. Identify effective therapeutic approaches for the treatment of trauma and PTSD, mood disorders, as well as a range of co-occurring disorders.
    4. Identify clinical applications of recent key scientific research and its implications in psychotherapy and counseling.

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    PROGRAM FOCUS:
    The 31st Annual Northwest Conference on Behavioral Health and Addictive Disorders provides a forum for exploring the complex issues within the physical, emotional, social and spiritual dimensions of mental illness and addictive disorders.  Applications of cutting edge research findings for counseling and psychotherapy will be discussed.  A renowned faculty of both clinicians and authors will allow for both lecture and interactive discussion of a wide range of issues which will be of interest for anyone working in Mental Health and  Addictive Disorders.


    Who Should Attend?
    The training will be valuable for those working in the areas of:
    • Mental Health
    • Addictions Counseling
    • Marriage and Family Therapy
    • Psychology
    • School Counseling
    • Registered Nursing
    • Courts and Corrections
    • Prevention
    • Employee Assistance
    • Pastoral Counseling
    • And Others Fields

     
    Limited Number of Exhibit Spaces Available


     
    For more information contact:

    Lorrie Keip Cositore
    1-800-851-9100 x9220
    lorriek@hcibooks.com

    Conference Site

    Hyatt Regency Bellevue is a Four Diamond hotel on Seattle’s desirable Eastside with a stunning guest tower. Stroll through connecting sky bridges and discover more than 250 shops, 45 restaurants and plenty of entertainment options harbored inside this chic urban streetscape. Room rates at the Hyatt Regency Bellevue are $185 single/double (plus tax). To make a reservation, please call the Hyatt Regency directly and use the code: UADC.  Reservations must be made by May 1, 2018 but room block may sell out prior to that date.


    Hyatt Regency Bellevue
    900 Bellevue Way NE
    Bellevue, Washington 98004
    Phone: (888) 421-1442 or (425) 462-1234

    Transportation to the Hotel

    Shuttle service from the Sea-Tac airport to the hotel is available. The Shuttle Express has a scheduled service to hotels which is approximately every ½ hour on the hour.  For departure from Bellevue hotel to Sea-Tac airport a 24-hour reservation is required.  Prices are subject to change.  Contact Shuttle Express at:  www.shuttleexpress.com or (425) 981-7000. Taxicabs are approximately $60.00.

    Faculty
    Andrea Barthwell, MD, DFASAM
    Andrea Grubb Barthwell, MD, DFASAM is an internationally renowned physician that has been a pioneer in the field of addiction medicine within the American Addiction Society of Medicine (ASAM) and a contributor to the field of alcoholism and addiction treatment. She is a past president of ASAM, was a
    Read More...
    Joan Borysenko, PhD
    This distinguished pioneer in integrative medicine is a world-renowned expert in the mind-body connection. Her work has been foundational in an international health-care revolution that recognizes the role of meaning, and the spiritual dimensions of life, as an integral part of health and healing. H
    Read More...
    Elisabeth Crim, PhD
    Elisabeth R. Crim, PhD, is a licensed psychologist and a certified relax and renew yoga trainer, has a PhD in psychology, and has MAs in psychology, theology, and counseling. Dr. Crim is a speaker, author, psychotherapist, and consultant. She is also the founder and CEO of Moonstone Center.
    Read More...
    Stephen Dansiger, PsyD, MFT
    Dr. Dansiger is a rocker who got sober in the late 80’s and then became a sought after clinician, writer and meditation teacher. He became a master EMDR therapist and provider of EMDR Basic Training and Advanced Topics Courses as Senior Faculty with the Institute for Creative Mindfulness and helped
    Read More...
    Lisa Erickson, MS, LMHC
    Has a full time psychotherapy practice in Seattle serving gifted adults, half of who struggle with addictions. Regionally, she offers continuing education programs on addiction, professional ethics, and narcissism. Nationally and internationally, Lisa presents and writes about working with the h
    Read More...
    Linda Graham, MFT
    An experienced psychotherapist in the San Francisco Bay Area who integrates modern neuroscience, mindfulness practices and relational psychology in her nationwide trainings and workshops. She is the author of Bouncing Back: Rewiring Your Brain for Maximum Resilience and Well-Being and The Resilience
    Read More...
    Michael Kahn, LPC, JD
    Presents training workshops on ethics, grief, diversity, self-care and other topics for mental health professionals throughout the U.S. and abroad. He wrote the chapter “Saying Goodbye: Loss and Bereavement” in Cinemeducation, Volume 2: Using Film and Other Visual Media in Graduate and Medical Educa
    Read More...
    John Lee, MA
    Best-selling author of The Flying Boy: Healing the Wounded Man, has written 22 books, including the The Half- Lived Life and the upcoming Breaking the Mother-Son Dynamic: Resetting the Patterns of a Man’s Life and Loves. Known for his innovative work in the fields of emotional intelligence, anger ma
    Read More...
    Peter Levine, PhD
    Developer of Somatic Experiencing® a naturalistic and neurobiological, approach to healing trauma which he has developed during the past 45 years. This work has been taught to 30,000 therapists in 43 countries. Dr. Levine has received the Lifetime Achievement award from the US Association for Bo
    Read More...
    Pat Love, EdD
    Known for her warmth, humor, and practical, research based wisdom. Distinguished professor, licensed marriage and family therapist and long-standing clinical member and approved supervisor in American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy and served as President of the International Associa
    Read More...
    Barbara Nosal, PhD, LMFT, LAADC
    Barbara Nosal has worked in the mental health and addiction treatment field with adolescents and their families for over 20 years. She has held managerial and clinical positions in a variety of treatment settings, including a private practice in Newport Beach. She holds a doctorate in Transpersonal
    Read More...
    Stephen Odom, LMFT,PhD
    Dr. Stephen Odom is a distinguished healthcare and addiction treatment professional with over 25 years of expertise in the behavioral health field. He currently, serves as the CEO and Chief Clinical Officer of New Vista Behavioral Health, the parent company of Center for Professional Recovery, Avalo
    Read More...
    Cynthia Price, PhD
    She is a Research Assoc. Professor at the University of Washington School of Nursing.  With a PhD in Nursing Science, her clinical background and expertise is in mind-body therapies and in working with people who are disconnected from their bodies due to stress, trauma, or emotional and physical
    Read More...
    Chanda Rankin, PhD, CADC II
    Chief Clinical Officer for Muir Wood Adolescent and Family Services. A licensed Clinical Psychologist and Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor, Dr. Rankin has worked with a variety of clinical populations suffering from addiction, mental illness and co-occurring disorders across adolescent, adult, a
    Read More...
    Ronald Siegel, PsyD
    Assistant Professor of Psychology, Part Time, at Harvard Medical School, where he has taught for over 30 years. He is a long time student of mindfulness meditation and serves on the Board of Directors and faculty of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy. He teaches internationally about the
    Read More...
    David Smith, MD, FASAM, FAACT
    Recognized as a national leader in the pharmacology and treatment of addictive disease, Dr. Smith is Founder of Haight-Ashbury Free Clinics in San Francisco, and Past President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. He is currently Chair of Addiction Medicine for Muir Wood Adolescent & F
    Read More...
    Robert Weiss, PhD, MSW
    Robert Weiss PhD, MSW  is a digital-age intimacy and relationships expert specializing in infidelity and addictions—most notably sex, porn, and love addiction. ●Author; Sex Addiction 101, Out of The Doghouse: A Step-by-Step Relationship-Saving Guide for Men Caught Cheating, Prodependence: Moving Bey
    Read More...
    Wallace Wilkins, PhD
    Wallace Wilkins, PhD, serves as seminar facilitator, organizational consultant, psychologist and conflict mediator. His workshops help individuals and organizations create low conflict, low stress and high achievement. His Seattle-based psychotherapy practice focuses on chemical dependency, mood pro
    Read More...

    Board Approvals

    PROFESSIONAL CREDITS:

    A maximum of 21 contact hours are available for this conference.

     

    18 core credit hours (6 hours for W, Th, and F) and 1.5 optional evening hours for Wednesday’s evening session and 1.5 optional evening hours for Thursday’s evening session. This training includes 3 hours of Ethics.

    American Psychological Association (APA)
    US Journal Training, Inc., is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. US Journal Training, Inc. maintains responsibility for this program and its content. 

    Association of Social Work Boards Approved Continuing Education (ACE)
    US Journal Training, Inc., #1143 is approved as a provider for social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) www.aswb.org through the Approved Continuing Education (ACE) Program. US Journal Training, Inc., maintains responsibility for the program. ASWB approval period: 12/5/16-12/5/19. Social Workers participating in this course will receive 24 continuing education clock hours.

    California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists
    Provider #56349 U.S. Journal Training is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists to sponsor continuing education for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs and/or LEPs. U.S. Journal Training maintains responsibility for this program/course and its content. Course meet qualifications for up to 21 hours of continuing education credit for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs and/or LEPs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences.

    California Board of Registered Nursing (CBRN)
    California Board of Registered Nursing (CBRN). Provider #10512.

    California Consortium of Addiction Programs and Professionals (CCAPP-E1)
    California Consortium of Addiction Programs and Professionals, Provider approved by CCAPP-E1. Provider number OS-86-057-0520 FOR 21CEHs.

    Canadian Addiction Counselors Certification Federation (CACCF)
    Canadian Addiction Counselors Certification Federation (CACCF).

    Certification Board for Addiction Professionals of Florida (No. 17A)

    EAP Association/EACC-Program
    EAP Association/EACC-Program Approved

    Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage/Family Therapy and Mental Health Counseling
    State of Florida Agency for Health Care Administration for Mental Health Counselors, Clinical Social Workers and Marriage/Family Therapists. Provider #50-2076.

    National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC)
    National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC). Approved Education Provider Program #10069.

    National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC), ACEP No. 5130
    U.S. Journal Training, Inc. has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5130. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. US Journal Training Inc. is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

    Full-Time conference attendees who complete all required evaluation and attendance documentation are eligible to receive the maximum number of contact hours. Daily registrants can receive credit for each day in attendance.

    Note: If you are seeking continuing education credit for a specialty not listed above, it is your responsibility to contact your licensing/certification board directly to determine eligibility of this training to meet your CEU requirement.

     
    ADA accommodations will be made in accordance with the law. If you require ADA accommodations, please indicate your needs by April 25, 2018. We cannot ensure the availability of appropriate accommodations without prior notification.


    Full-Time Registration (May 30-June 1, 2018)
    up to 21 hours
    Tuition: $465.00
    Register Now Group Registration

    Daily Registration Wed., May 30, 2018
    6 core CEs
    Tuition: $165.00
    Register Now Group Registration

    Daily Registration Thur., May 31, 2018
    6 core CEs
    Tuition: $165.00
    Register Now Group Registration

    Daily Registration Fri., June 1, 2018
    6 core CEs
    Tuition: $165.00
    Register Now Group Registration


    Early Registration Rate:

    Registrations received or processed by midnight (EST) April 25, 2018 will qualify for the early rate.

    Group Discount:

    Groups of TWO or MORE registrations, entered on one order, receive a 10% Discount per registration! This offer applies to conference registrations only and cannot be combined with other discounts/coupon offers.

    Cancellation/Refunds:

    All registration fees are refundable, less a $50.00 processing fee, when requests for cancellation are submitted in writing and postmarked by May 10. No refunds are available after May 10.

    Other ways to register:

    By Phone: 800-441-5569 or 954-360-0909. Please have your MC/Visa/AMEX number ready. (Business Hours are M-F, 8:30 am - 5:00 pm ET) 


    By FAX: 954-360-0034. You must first print out our Registration Form.  To do this, click on the Brochure Tab and print out the Registration form. Please make sure to include MC/Visa, AMEX number, exp. date, security code and signature.


    By Mail: Registration by mail requires check, credit card information or agency purchase order accompanied by a completed registration form. To get the Registration Form, click on the Brochure Tab and print out the form. If paying by credit card, please make sure to include MC/Visa, AMEX number, exp. date, security code and signature. If paying by check, please make check payable to: U.S. Journal Training, Inc.

    Mail to:
    U .S. Journal Training/Seattle
    3201 SW 15th St
    Deerfield Beach, FL 33442-8190

    When you provide a check for payment, you authorize us either to use information from your check to make a one-time electronic fund transfer from your account or to process the payment as a check transaction. When we use information from your check to make an electronic fund transfer, funds may be withdrawn from your account as soon as the same day you make your payment, and you will not receive your check back from your financial institution. For inquiries please call 954-360-0909.

    Your name and address will be added to our mailing list unless otherwise requested.

    ADA accommodation will be made in accordance with the law. If you require ADA accommodations, please indicate your needs no later than 5 weeks prior to the conference start date, USJT phone 800-851-9100. We cannot ensure the availability of appropriate accommodations without prior notification.